The Adventure Begins!

Security/Safety

This is a tough one because it really depends on the type of remote work you choose to do. If your going to be an employee or affiliate for a company you’ll just need the basics, however, if you are going to take the freelance or entrepreneur route and plan on getting some exposure (E.g. youtube series, blog series, press releases, social media campaigns, etc.) then you’re going to need to beef up your security when traveling.

There are a lot of situations that you can encounter working remotely over the road and it’s important that you are prepared for them as best as you can be. Below I am going to break down different security options for general security, advanced security, online security, and cybersecurity that you may want to consider before you hit the road or that you might want to implement if you’re already traveling.

If you gain a following of fans, there’s always going to be the chance of encountering a fan that might be overly obsessed or even a viewer that despises you and gets violent. You’ll also be subject to thieves and cyber attacks (if you operate an online business).

Table Of Contents

General Security Advanced Security Online Security Cyber Security

General Security

  • A smartphone with service in case you need to make an emergency phone call or record an encounter.
  • (If you have a large following) It’s handy to post a schedule of availability on your door/window to let anyone know that approaches your rig/RV (That recognized you) that you are only available at specific hours of the day for one on one socializing/consulting. It’s important that you have some privacy and a little control over your schedule when traveling to help keep you and your family a little safer.
  • A tire thumper for those of you with dualies. It’s handy to check your inner tires to make sure they aren’t flat and handy in a pinch if you were assaulted and need to defend yourself. Be sure to check our traveling weapon laws resource.
  • A door/motion alarm or pet dog/companion to help you sleep more peacefully at night knowing that you’ll be alerted if anyone tries to break in and that the sound will more than likely scare them away.
  • A dash cam to record while driving. Not only will the cam help you if an accident occurs so you have evidence for an insurance claim, the visual presentation of the cam can detour a potential thief or attacker.
  • A side clipped knife that comes in handy in an emergency (E.g. Cutting a seatbelt lose that jammed in an accident, etc.) and is within the state/county/municipality laws. The visual presence alone can detour a potential thief or attacker without ever removing it from your side. Be sure to check our traveling weapon laws resource.
  • An RFID sleave for your credit cards with chips in them so nobody can scan them secretly while standing next to you in a line or crowded area.
  • Avoid high crime areas. The closer you are to the hotspots the higher the probability of your safety being compromised will be. You can usually find crime area information online easily or you can install an app that alerts you of crime areas you are near/approaching. App example: RedZone
  • Stay alert to your surroundings at all times. If you are uncomfortable after seeing something suspicious, keep moving, don’t stop.
  • Steel toed boots/shoes are great for protecting your toes from getting crushed when something falls or rolls over them. They can also provide you with the ability to stop an attacker. Brass knuckles are illegal in most states/municipalities, however, steel-toed work/safety boots/shoes are not.
  • A cane will definitely help if you have a medical condition that requires more support for walking. It can also come in handy to stop an attacker if needed.
  • Motion sensor lights attached to your rig will help light up the area whenever someone or something triggers the motion sensor. This will generally detour anyone that had bad intentions as the light coming on startles them.
  • (Urban) Stay in areas with plenty of lighting. The larger the population, the higher the crime rates. Many criminals avoid well-lit areas.
  • (Urban) Stay in areas with clearly visible security cameras pointing towards you. The larger the population, the higher the crime rates. Many criminals avoid security cameras.
  • Use common sense and these tips to prevent being robbed while traveling.

 

Advanced Security

  • Self-defense classes can help teach you how to discipline and protect yourself from attackers.
  • A stun gun comes in many shapes and sizes. Be sure to check with local/state laws before entering an area that prohibits them, requires special licensing, or has travel/storage requirements.
  • Pepper spray is small enough to go in your pocket, purse, or clip to your side. Be sure to check with local/state laws before entering an area that prohibits them, requires special licensing, or has travel/storage requirements.
  • A firearm comes in many shapes and sizes. Be sure to check with local/state laws before entering an area that prohibits them, requires special licensing, or has travel/storage requirements.
  • A bulletproof vest, stab vest, or other kevlar clothing can help you stay safe if you are a higher profile traveler. Be sure to check with local/state laws before entering an area that prohibits them, requires special licensing, or has travel/storage requirements.

Be sure to check out our individual state weapon laws for travelers resource. It’s important to check the laws in every state you’ll be passing through so you can avoid any unexpected surprises.


 

Online Security

  • Wait to post publicly about your most recent visit/location until after you have already left. This will assist in limiting most of the random door knocking at all hours from people that read where you were and traveled specifically to speak with you in person. There’s a lot of good people out there, but occasionally, it’s that one bad one that shows up at your door.
  • Don’t share too much personal information. Keep your business, pleasure, and family life separate (If applicable). If your blog/journal is about your family travels, that’s fine, just don’t share too much.
  • Avoid participating in heated controversial debates (Politics, religion, etc.) that could attract heated/unstable engagement (On and offline if they know where you are).
  • You do have the option of creating an anonymous alias to use socially. A lot of people do that. Just keep in mind that in doing so, you remove some of your authority when it comes down to doing business. People like doing business with real people. An alias (Fake name) can cause a psychological relation to dishonesty or shady practices (Even though you may be the most honest and nicest person in the world).

 

Cyber Security

  • A virus/malware scanner is a must. You’ll want one with real-time protection. You can start with a free one (E.g. AVG™) or go with a paid software (E.g. Norton).
  • Domain privacy is handy to hide your identity from a domain name you invested into or that you are using for your website business/blog/etc. Godaddy™ offers domain privacy.
  • An SSL (Secure Socket Layer) is another great added security measure to take if you have a website that processes any payments or stores members/customers/clients data. Godaddy™ offers SSL certificates. Note: If you are using WordPress, you can get a FREE SSL through CloudFlare
  • Spam can get overbearing on your website. If you are developing your blog/business on the free opensource platform of WordPress, you’ll want to look into the Akismet plugin to help combat spam.

 

Before you get started looking for work, be sure that you have read about all the requirements of working remotely. Don’t skip anything I outlined there. I know it’s a lot of reading, but you’ll be thankful you read it all later.

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